Git Deployment – Shallow Clone Support in Azure App Services – The missing piece

Azure App Services and the open source project KuduSync behind this great Azure Service is a huge time saver for agile teams. Especially DevOps teams will like the continuous deployment features.  Personally I focus a lot on the Git based deployment which enables you to roll back and forward in seconds whenever it is required. Beside that, it is possible to work with standard tools available on market to implement continuous deployment or integration.

Deployments - Microsoft Azure 2017-07-18 06-48-11

When I started working with Azure App Services building Node.js apps, I wrote a little node package called Azure Deploy. It allowed me to push changes as part of a build process directly into the Azure App Service. Originally, CodeShip was the service of choice for the build process but since I need to support Git Repositories beside GitHub, BitBucket and GitLabs, I migrated to Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) and the integrated build platform.

vso-build-tasks

After several months and hundreds of deploys, which means hundreds of commits to the local git repository, it became a fairly complex and fat thing. This is normally not a problem but my Azure Deploy package clones the local git repository from Azure App Service to a temp directory and copies the build output over it. Last but not least it commits and pushes the changes back to Azure. The big repository took more than 4 minutes to clone so I was wondering if I can use Shallow Clone to get only the latest state of the repository.

This idea works well on Unix based git servers, on GitHub or even in Visual Studio Team Services as well. But when you try to clone a local Git Repository of Azure App Services via Shallow Clone option

git clone --depth 1 https://github.com/jquery/jquery.git jquery

it ends up with an error. The error and its background is also documented in the GitHub project of KuduSync here. So what to do now?

Another nice option of Azure App Services is the option to pull changes from a Git Repository instantly after a commit. This works well in VSTS, based on GitHooks but also with GitHub and a couple other platforms. It’s also possible to clone via shallow clone flag from these repositories which closes the loop. The final solution is to commit into a VSTS or GitHub hosted publishing repository which triggers a pull deployment in Azure App Services.

At the end this change reduced the whole deployment time from 5 up to 9 minutes, down to approx. 90 seconds. You can find the updated Azure Deploy component in the NPM registry here.

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